Help! I'm an Accidental Government Information Librarian Webinars

 

Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian Webinars

The Government Resources Section of the North Carolina Library Association welcomes you to a series of webinars designed to help us all do better reference work by increasing our familiarity with government information resources, and by discovering the best strategies for navigating them.  These sessions will be recorded and made available after the live sessions, linked from the NCLA GRS web page (http://www.nclaonline.org/government-resources).

Mailing List!:  If you like our webinar series and interested in hearing about future webinars, please contact Lynda Kellam at lmkellam [at] uncg [dot] edu to be added to our Help! mailing list.

The Help! Webinars YouTube Channel!- GRS Past Chair Lynda Kellam was awarded the NewsBank/Readex/GODORT/ALA Catharine J. Reynolds Research Grant and is using this grant to digitize our Help! webinars and add them to our YouTube Channel. In the future all recorded sessions will be linked to this channel.  Please take a look!

Upcoming Webinar:

Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... The National Science Foundation: Statistical data and grantseeker resources, September 19 from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. (Eastern).

This webinar will give an overview of the National Science Foundation, or NSF, website. The two main areas covered will be (1) accessing NSF-sponsored statistics and (2) understanding the NSF’s grantmaking structure. The NSF is the main government unit funding and studying the nation’s science and technology development. The NSF collects and disseminates statistical data on state science and technology indicators and science and engineering research in higher education. And, have you seen those notes that say “Funded in part by the NSF” or something similar? That’s the National Science Foundation at work. They are the largest U. S. federal agency that funds research on all science and technology except for human health. Any campus with faculty in the research sciences (chemistry, physics, computer science, biology, technology, and more) has reason to be interested in the NSF. So whether you are interested in supporting statistical needs about U.S. science or supporting faculty researchers when they are looking for NSF funding, this session will give you a starting place!

Nina Exner is the Researcher and Grant Support Services librarian at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. She has her MLS from NCCU, an MA from UNC-G, and is a current doctoral candidate at UNC-CH. Her professional focus is on supporting faculty and graduate students with their research, and serves as the “embedded” librarian with NC A&T’s Office of Research Development (including sponsored programs). This embedding brings scholarly communications, information literacy, and reference consultations into campus sponsored research programs.

We will meet together for Session #62, online on September 19 from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. (Eastern). Please RSVP for the session using this link: http://tinyurl.com/grssession62

We will use WebEx for the live session. Information on testing and accessing the session will be made available when you register.

The session will be recorded and available after the live session, linked from the NCLA GRS web page and YouTube channel.

 

Past Webinars:

Date Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents...
August 8, 2016 Climbing Capitol Hill Redux: The Basics of Congressional Research
July 26, 2016 The APIs of Data.gov
June 15, 2016 The Rules Rule: Understanding and Researching Congressional Procedure
May 17, 2016 Legal Research Basics Redux
April 25, 2016 State Government Information and the copyright conundrum
March 18, 2016 Get App(y): Government apps and mobile sites
February 17, 2016 Statistics Canada data for researchers beyond the Canadian borders
January 25, 2016 Overview of the MPC Data Infrastructure Projects
January 13, 2016 The United States Congressional Serial Set ...15577 Volumes and Counting!
November 11, 2015 Making Peace with United Nations Data: Learn to navigate UN data information sources
October 7, 2015 Friends, Enemies, and Interests: Foreign Affairs Research with Government Information
September 16, 2015 Where are those containers going? An Introduction to U.S. and Global Trade Data
August 12, 2015 Accessing Datasets for the Data Curious
June 24, 2015 Order in the Court Records: Finding Briefs, Transcripts, and other Court Materials
May 20, 2015 Money Matters: Federal Agencies and Financial Literacy
April 29, 2015 Finding Government Data on the Environment
March 18, 2015 National Institute on Money in State Politics
February 25, 2015 Accessing Federal electronic records at the National Archives
January 12, 2015 Fugitive hunters: community-based digital collection development of born-digital government information
December 11, 2014 Understanding the Budget of the United States
December 3, 2014 Data & Statistics for Researching Education
November 19, 2014 The Bureau of Labor Statistics - Part 3 (Part 3 of 3)
October 22, 2014 The Bureau of Labor Statistics - Part 2 (Part 2 of 3)
August 13, 2014 The Bureau of Labor Statistics - Part 1 (Part 1 of 3)
June 19, 2014 Emergency Preparedness:  How to Get Ready
May 19, 2014 Lights-Camera-Action! – Congressional Committee Hearings
April 16, 2014 Regulate this!  Federal Regulations
March 17, 2014 Tracking Legislation
February 21, 2014 Keeping  up with Congress
December 10, 2013 Secrets of the Congressional Record
November 18, 2013 Geocoding for Beginners
October 7, 2013 I Didn’t Know I Could Do That!
August 21, 2013 Historical Economic Data Sources & Economic Time Travel
August 8, 2013 Climbing Capitol Hill: The Basics of Congressional Research
June 12, 2013 Just the Facts, Ma’am!  Getting Started with the U.S. Census & American FactFinder
May 14, 2013 Legal Research ...Without the Law Library

April 22, 2013

Come to Your Census: the development of the U.S. Census from its inception to the present
March 27, 2013 All you ever wanted to know about Economic Indicators!
February 27, 2013 Homeland Security Digital Library

January 16, 2013

Information for International Development: Poverty Reduction, International Organizations, and Civil Society.

December 13, 2012

British and Commonwealth legal materials

November 14, 2012

United Nations Statistics and Data Resources

October 2012

Web-based Outreach to Non-Traditional Documents Librarians

September 22, 2012

Mooooooore Data at the USDA!

 

September 19, 2012

Researching the House Un-American Activities Committee

June 19, 2012

Hunting Down Fugitives and What to Do With Them Once You Found Them.

May 4, 2012

The American Community Survey

April 17, 2012

The Basics, and a Bit Beyond

February 23, 2012

Government Resources of the European Union

February 2, 2012

The Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project (WVHP)

January 5, 2012

What You Need to Know About the Creative Commons

December 9, 2011

PubMed, PubMed Central, and Medlineplus - What's the difference?

November 16, 2011

Finding your way: Maps and geospatial information from the federal government

November 9, 2011

Beginner’s Guide to Legislative History


September 21, 2011

State Agency Databases with Daniel Cornwall from the Alaska State Library

September 7, 2011

Good Health (Information) in North Carolina

July 27, 2011

Resources for Guard and Reserve Soldiers and their Families

July 13, 2011

Beyond Google: Effective Patent Searching in Every Library

June 14, 2011

The Economic Census

June 9, 2011

American FactFinder and Census 2010

May 11, 2011

Genealogy Using Government Information

April 14, 2011

The Basics

 

Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents...Climbing Capitol Hill Redux: The Basics of Congressional Research, August 8, 2016.

Do questions about congressional research make you wish you had paid more attention in civics class in high school? Have no fear, while researching (or helping others research) the activities of our Congress may seem daunting, it really isn't once you know the basics and a few tricks. This webinar will break down the types of Congressional information that are out there, discuss what types of information they contain and provide strategies for helping researchers find and use them.

Rosalind Tedford is the Director for Research and Instruction at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University. She earned her BA in English and Psychology as well as her MA in English from Wake Forest and an MLIS from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In addition to managing the research and instruction programs at Wake Forest she teaches for-credit information literacy courses and is the liaison to both the Political Science and Communication departments. She has presented at LOEX, ACRL, ALA and regional conferences on issues ranging from copyright to technology trends to information literacy. In what little free time she has, she can be found hanging out with her two kids, watching ACC basketball and reading (but not at the same time).  She can be reached at tedforrl [at] wfu [dot] edu

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... The APIs of Data.gov, July 26, 2016.

Have you ever heard people talking about APIs and wondered what they are and why someone would use them? Have you ever tried to use Data.gov and felt overwhelmed by all of the different data formats available? This webinar aims to answer these questions by explaining APIs and their purpose, showing how to navigate Data.gov and understand the different data types offered, and demonstrate how you can leverage APIs in your projects.

Julia Frankosky is the Government Information Librarian at Michigan State University. She received a MLIS from Wayne State University and a B.A. in History from Michigan State University.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... The Rules Rule: Understanding and Researching Congressional Procedure, June 15, 2016.

Many of our users are familiar with the basic process by which the U.S. Congress enacts legislation. They have all at least seen the famous and beloved “I’m Just a Bill” cartoon from Schoolhouse Rock! The various rules of procedure that govern this process, however, are generally less well-known and somewhat perplexing. This can be problematic for those researching legislative history or trying to understand the way Congress works because these rules play an incredibly important role in how (and what) legislation is enacted. As former U.S. Representative John Dingell once said, “I’ll let you write the substance [of a law] . . . and you let me write the procedure, and I’ll screw you every time.”

This webinar will provide an introduction to the rules of procedure of the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives. It will include what the rules are, how they are adopted, and where to find them as well as a discussion of some of the myths and misunderstandings about congressional procedure. Participants will also receive a list of key resources for helping users research and understand this enigmatic subject.

Presenter Morgan Stoddard is a Research Services Coordinator at the George Washington University Library and adjunct professor of law at the Georgetown University Law Center where she teaches advanced legal research. She has a J.D. and M.S.L.S. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a B.A. in journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Legal Research Basics Redux, May 17, 2016.

Researching the law is a complex and difficult process, even for those with a legal background! This webinar will outline a mix of free and low-cost resources which can help librarians and library patrons find and use legal materials effectively. “Legal Research Basics” is an updated version of the NCLA legal research webinar which was presented in May 2013.

Jennifer L. Behrens is the Head of Reference Services & a Lecturing Fellow at Duke Law School’s J. Michael Goodson Law Library, where she provides regular instruction on legal research topics. Jennifer holds both a JD and an MLS from the University at Buffalo, and previously worked as a graduate assistant in UB’s Charles B. Sears Law Library as well as its Lockwood Library’s former Business & Government Documents Reference Center. She served as Secretary/Treasurer of NCLA’s Government Resources Section from 2009-2011.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... State Government Information and the copyright conundrum, April 25, 2016.

Figuring out whether state government documents are copyrighted is a tricky question. Copyright law has significant impact on the work libraries, digital repositories, and even state agencies, with regards to digitizing and web archiving state government information.

Free State Government Information (FSGI) http://stategov.freegovinfo.info/ has been steadily working to raise awareness and find pathways forward for policy change with regards to the copyright issue of state government publications.

This presentation will cover:

  • who we are and why we are tackling copyright issues with state governmentspecific state government information projects that academic, state, and digital libraries are engaged in that are impacted by copyright
  • a way forward to address copyright policy in the states: Kyle Courtney’s 50 state survey of copyright policies, State Copyright Resource Center http://copyright.lib.harvard.edu/states/

Speakers:

Bernadette Bartlett is the Michigan Documents Librarian at the Library of Michigan and often am approached by coworkers, fellow state employees and members of the public with questions about copyright and Michigan state government information. She’s currently working on compiling a historical record of how the State of Michigan has addressed copyright of state government information in law, rule and policy and she contributes to discussions and planning within the library as they relate to copyright.

Kyle K. Courtney is the Copyright Advisor at Harvard University, working out of the Office for Scholarly Communication. Kyle created the Copyright First Responder network for Harvard, which is a team of copyright trained librarians that help establish a culture of shared understanding of copyright law among faculty, students, and staff in support of pedagogy, research, and innovation. His work at Harvard also includes a role as the Information Policy Advisor for the edX/HarvardX online classes. He is a published author and nationally recognized speaker on the topic of copyright, technology, and the law. His blog is at http://kylecourtney.com“> and he can be found on Twitter @KyleKCourtney.

Kristina Eden coordinates the work of over 50 copyright reviewers on the Copyright Review Management System (CRMS) which is an IMLS funded project to determine the copyright status of digitized books. Where legally permissible, they work with HathiTrust Digital Library (http://www.hathitrust.org) to open public domain works, including state documents, and make them available to online users.

Kris Kasianovitz is the State, Local and International Government Information Librarian at the Stanford University Library. She’s worked with state and local government for a number of years and has repeatedly dealt with the copyright issue of these materials, especially when it comes to digitization and web archiving for researchers.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Get App(y): Government apps and mobile sites, March 18, 2016.
Many people rely on smartphones and tablets to access the internet, and the number of mobile device applications and websites has exploded in recent years.  Following these trends, government entities have been busy creating apps of their own.  Currently, there are hundreds of apps and mobile websites from federal, state, and local governments.  This session focuses on the various types of government apps that are available as well as free, online resources you can use to find them.
 
Presenter Emily Lawson has served as a Reference and Research Librarian at the University of Houston Law Center O’Quinn Law Library since 2009.  She received her JD from Indiana University Maurer School of Law and her MLS from Indiana University.  In addition, she often writes and presents regarding legal apps and technology issues.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Statistics Canada data for researchers beyond the Canadian borders, February 17, 2016.

Ever wonder what Statistics Canada data you can access if you’re not living and working in Canada? You’ve heard about the Data Liberation Initiative, but can you access this and other data? What about those elusive Master data files and custom tabulations? Let us be your guides to the wonderful trove of Statistics Canada data that is available to all. Berenica Vejvoda from McGill University and Michelle Edwards from Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research will give you a tour of commonly used StatsCan resources.

Michelle Edwards is the Research Data Services Librarian at Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research (CISER). She is responsible for the acquisition, maintenance, development, and preservation of the collections housed in the CISER Data archive. Michelle has worked in the “Data” forum for more than 15 years following her PostDoc in the field of beef quantitative genetics. She was instrumental in building the Data Resource Centre at the University of Guelph to be one of Canada’s premier data services and was one of two developers of the ODESI Data portal. Her background in data and statistical analyses enables her to work with researchers across many disciplines.

Berenica Vejvoda is the Data Librarian at McGill University where she provides support for numeric data services. Prior to McGill, Berenica as a data librarian at the University of Toronto as well as the University of California at San Diego. Berenica has worked with data for 15 years in various capacities and is involved in local, regional, national and international data initiatives.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Overview of the MPC Data Infrastructure Projects, January 25, 2016.

The Minnesota Population Center (MPC) is home to several large social science data infrastructure projects disseminating census and survey data from the U.S. and around the world (www.ipums.org). All MPC data are harmonized for consistency across time and place, fully documented, and easily accessible online for the research community. In this workshop we will provide detailed explanations of the data available, describe how the data are harmonized, and demonstrate extracting and analyzing the data free of charge online.
 
Katie Genadek manages the IPUMS-USA project and directs dissemination and outreach at the Minnesota Population Center. She is also an economist researching family circumstances and labor market decisions, time spent with partners, and well-being over the life course: all questions that can be analyzed using MPC data.

Catherine Fitch is the Associate Director of the Minnesota Population Center and she has been working on IPUMS and related census data infrastructure for more than twenty years. As historical demographer, she is interested in family formation and measuring change over time (and IPUMS makes that easy to do).

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... The United States Congressional Serial Set ...15577 Volumes and Counting!, January 13, 2016.

Wake up! While inventorying this monotonously bound iconic collection may be better for fighting insomnia than counting sheep, the content in the "sheep-bound set" might keep you awake.  Seriously... this webinar will explore the depth and breath of information available in the United States Congressional Serial Set, while we also consider how its history both hinders and enables our ability to discover and access nearly 200 years of government information.

Carmen Orth-Alfie is  the Coordinator of Government Information Services and Engagement at the University of Kansas Libraries.  Her Federal Depository Library work experiences spans over three decades.  She shelved the print Serial Set volumes as a student and now as Regional Coordinator,  promotes discovery and access using various electronic editions of the Serial Set

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Making Peace with United Nations Data: Learn to navigate UN data information sources.  (November 11, 2015)

Learn where agencies and key initiatives store their data in the United Nation’s many repositories. This program will examine and differentiate between information sources at the United Nations Statistics Division, UNdata.com, UN Libraries and Information Centers. We will discuss where to find country, demographic and trade data in addition to how to field basic UN-related reference questions. The program will also briefly discuss the UN’s data visualization efforts in Comtrade and statistics promotion through World Statistics Day. Join this webinar to learn new reference sources for data and programming ideas for your college and university community.

Lisa DeLuca is the Liaison Librarian for the School of Diplomacy and International Relations. She received her MLIS from Rutgers University and is currently an MPA student at Seton Hall. Her research interests include helping students and faculty to upgrade their research output with data visualization.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Friends, Enemies, and Interests: Foreign Affairs Research with Government Information (October 7, 2015)

How does the United States government determine its foreign policy? How does it articulate and promote its interests? Are there government sources that shed light on foreign relations, or is it all cloak-and-dagger operations and top secret documents? In this session, we will explore strategies for conducting historical and contemporary foreign affairs research using government information. We will look closely at one of the essential resources for historical foreign affairs research, Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS), and also discuss selected foreign relations resources from the State Department, the National Security Council, and Congress.

Melanie Maksin is the Librarian for Political Science, International Affairs, Public Policy, and Government Information at Yale University. She received her MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh and is currently an MA student in Higher and Postsecondary Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include critical pedagogy in academic librarianship and instruction and outreach approaches related to government information and other primary sources.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Where are those containers going? An Introduction to U.S. and Global Trade Data (September 16, 2015)

Trade data is its own little world of business and economics statistics. It has plenty of jargon (Schedule B, reporter country, partner countries, re-exports, re-imports, Bill of Lading, etc.) and a vegetable soup of acronyms (HC, HS, HTS, SITC, USITC, FAS, TEU, etc.) U.S. trade data’s commodity codes can be as short as 2-digits or at long as 10. There are many trade data sources provided by the United States and Canadian governments, the United Nations, and commercial vendors. And you can get some data U.S. states and urban areas. In this introduction to trade data, UNCG’s Steve Cramer will discuss the core concepts (and some of the pesky acronyms) and demonstrate them using free sources provided by the U.S. and U.N. (and perhaps one from Canada with unique features and U.S. coverage, time permitting). The most important fee-based sources will be mentioned in comparison to the free ones.

Steve Cramer has been the UNCG Business Librarian since 2001. As a Coleman Fellow for Entrepreneurship Education, he teaches the 3-credit class ENT/GEO/LIS 530: Researching Opportunities in Entrepreneurship & Economic Development in the spring semester. Steve is co-founder of Business Librarianship in North Carolina (BLINC), a member of ALA’s BRASS, and a Carolina Consortium negotiator. He blogs at https://liaisonlife.wordpress.com/ With Professor Nicholas Williamson, Steve co-teaches MKT 426: International Marketing each fall and spring. In this class, the student teams engage in a research-intensive, experiential-learning project called “Export Odyssey”. The goal of Export Odyssey is for each team to make a sale to a new country market for its North Carolina manufacturer (examples at http://uncgnow.uncg.edu/uncg-export-odyssey-2/.) Steve has co-published with Professor Williamson, and they are co-inventors of trade analysis intellectual property optioned to a software development company through UNCG’s Office of Innovation Commercialization.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Accessing Datasets for the Data Curious (August 12, 2015).

Directing patrons to subscription repositories of data like ICPSR and Roper is a useful service that any reference librarian can learn to do. But can the generalist take data-seeking patrons just a little bit further before referring to the data librarian? This webinar will help the generalist or subject librarian learn ways to help patrons download data successfully, use documentation to explore the relevance of a dataset to answer a question, and alert patrons to common pitfalls and patterns. Participants will learn strategies to apply their librarian expertise for finding and accessing information to the rarified realm of datasets.

Presenter Kristin Partlo is the Reference & Instruction Librarian for Social Science and Data at Carleton College in Minnesota. She has been helping undergraduates find and evaluate data for over ten years and especially enjoys looking for connections between research data services and other areas of librarianship. Her MA of LIS is from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Order in the Court Records: Finding Briefs, Transcripts, and other Court Materials (June 24, 2015).

Library patrons have many reasons to ask for help with finding court filings: from tracking the progress of a pending lawsuit, to digging up centuries-old court materials for genealogical research, and countless other academic or personal pursuits in between. The unpublished nature of many court materials can make such research very challenging for librarians. But before you refer your patrons elsewhere, hear some tips and tricks for locating court opinions, briefs, filings, and other materials related to court cases from all levels of courts in both state and federal systems.
 
Presenter Jennifer L. Behrens, is the Head of Reference Services & a Lecturing Fellow at Duke Law School’s J. Michael Goodson Law Library, where she provides regular instruction on legal research topics. Jennifer holds both a JD and an MLS from the University at Buffalo, and previously worked as a graduate assistant in UB’s Charles B. Sears Law Library as well as its Lockwood Library’s former Business & Government Documents Reference Center. She served as Secretary/Treasurer of NCLA’s Government Resources Section from 2009-2011.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Money Matters: Federal Agencies and Financial Literacy (May 20, 2015)

Understanding basic financial concepts is essential to manage money and avoid falling into financial traps, but many people don’t know where to turn to learn or improve their knowledge. The friendly face at the library reference desk seems like a viable option - but do you know where to send your patron in need? This session focuses on the role of the federal government in the financial literacy of Americans, and will examine free resources and tools from a variety of agencies that can help your patrons (and you!) better understand their financial lives.

Presenter Rebecca Hyde has thirteen years experience working in federal depository libraries and is currently the Government Information, Political Science and Sustainability Librarian at Saint Louis University. Her interest in financial planning dates back at least to age five when she told her parents she was saving spare change for college.

Presenter Lucia Orlando has sixteen years experience working in federal depository libraries and is currently a Research Support Services librarian at the University of California Santa Cruz.  She came late to the importance of financial planning, after taking on debt with her very first credit card.

Rebecca and Lucia have co-authored the “Federal Documents Focus” column in the Government Documents Round Table’s (GODORT) Documents to the People since 2010.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Finding Government Data on the Environment (April 29, 2015)

Presenter Ann Marshall has eleven years of experience as an academic librarian and was most recently the subject liaison to the political science department at the University of Rochester. She has provided computer training and support to upstate rural public libraries as part of a Gates Foundation grant. She is co-author of “What an Experience: Library Staff Participation in Ethnographic Research” and is a former Chair of the Law and Political Science Section (LPSS) of ACRL.

Interest in sustainability has grown exponentially at colleges and universities, such that a 2009 New York Times articles announced, “Sustainability Field Booms on Campus,” noting growth at both liberal arts institutions and at community colleges. This session focuses on finding governmental data relevant to research on sustainability, and will examine tools provided by agencies such as the EPA, Department of Energy, and some selected international sources. In addition, the session will suggest strategies for answering a data question, especially when its unclear where to begin or when other sources have been exhausted. The session is offered by Ann Marshall, a former political science librarian at the University of Rochester.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... National Institute on Money in State Politics. (March 18, 2015)

Presenter Edwin Bender, executive director of the National Institute on Money in State Politics, has been connecting the dots between campaign finance and public policy for more than a decade. He promotes the free use of the Institute’s comprehensive, highly credentialed political donor information by investigative journalists, scholars examining state elections and public-policy processes, and attorneys involved in campaign-finance litigation—and is now focused on empowering librarians across the country.

What could YOU do with $2 billion? That’s the amount contributed to candidates and committees for 2014 state races. And why would there be so much monetary interest in these races? Sometimes legislators vote in obvious ways—and sometimes constituents wonder what may have prompted a certain vote. Ditto for governors and, now more than ever, our elected judiciary. This webinar will help you learn how to research a state candidate’s donor base, the top-giving industries, and possible connections between contributors, proposed legislation, and lobbyists.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Accessing Federal electronic records at the National Archives.  (February 25, 2015)

For well over a century, the U.S. government has produced an ever increasing volume and array of electronic records.  These records range from World War II Army enlistment data to 1970s State Department telegrams to 2010 home mortgage data.  But once the creating agency no longer has a need for the electronic records, where do they go?  The National Archives accessions, preserves, and provides access to U.S. Federal Government electronic records of permanent value.  This webinar will provide an overview on the types of government electronic records, especially data, available at the National Archives and how to access it.

Presenter Lynn Goodsell is the Reference Branch Chief for Electronic Records Division of the National Archives.  She has been with the Division since 2004.  She has a M.A. in history with an emphasis on archival management from the University of California, Riverside.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ...  Fugitive hunters: community-based digital collection development of born-digital government information (January 12, 2015)

“Fugitive” documents – documents not sent automatically to FDLP libraries – have always been a problem for the FDLP community. Libraries have historically dealt with fugitives aggressively and creatively, collectively and individually, in response to the needs of their Designated Communities. However, the scope of the problem in the born-digital era is geometrically greater.

To wit, the number of "tangible" documents distributed by GPO in a year (about 10 thousand) and the number of digital documents in FDsys (about 7 million) is only a tiny fraction of the number of born-digital files harvested in the 2008 End of Term crawl of the .gov domain (about 160 million).

This presentation will give context to the "fugitive" issue and the digital present, demonstrating that born-digital community-wide collection development is a logical, rational, responsible, and important part of a document librarian's job. It will help govt information librarians convince their administrations that building collections of born digital government information is the most effective and efficient way that each library can address the information needs of their own communities.

The presentation will provide practical examples of techniques that libraries of any size and budget can use to collect born-digital documents individually and in bulk via Web harvesting.

It will offer a coherent vision of a digital FDLP in which libraries actively participate and collaborate, building a more complete, more comprehensive, more secure national collection of born-digital government information.
Presenter James A. Jacobs (jajacobs [at] ucsd [dot] edu) is Data Services Librarian Emeritus, University of California San Diego. He has more than 25 years experience working with digital information, digital services, and digital library collections. He is a technical consultant and advisor to the Center for Research Libraries in the auditing and certification of digital repositories using the Trusted Repository Audit Checklist (TRAC) and related CRL criteria. He served as Data Services Librarian at the University of California San Diego from 1985 to 2006 and co-taught the ICPSR summer workshop, "Providing Social Science Data Services: Strategies for Design and Operation" from 1990 to 2012. He is a co-founder of Free Government Information (freegovinfo.info).

Presenter James R. Jacobs (jrjacobs [at] stanford [dot] edu is the US Government Information Librarian at Stanford University Libraries where he works on both traditional collection development as well as digital projects like LOCKSS-USDOCS and Web harvesting. He received his MSLIS in 2002 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a member of ALA's Government Documents Roundtable (GODORT) and served a 3 year term (2009 – 2012) on Depository Library Council to the Public Printer, including serving as DLC Chair from 2011 – 2012. He is a co-founder of Free Government Information (freegovinfo.info) and Radical Reference (radicalreference.info) and is on the board of Question Copyright, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that promotes a better public understanding of the history and effects of copyright, and encourages the development of alternatives to information monopolies.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Understanding the Budget of the United States (December 11, 2014)

What is the difference between mandatory and discretionary spending? What is the role of entities such as the Office of Management and Budget and Congressional Budget Office? How much did the federal government spend on a particular program in a given year? Helping library patrons with questions such as these about the federal budget and government spending can be a challenge without a solid understanding of the federal budget and appropriations process. This webinar will describe how the federal budget and appropriations process works and provide information on key resources for researching this complex topic.

Presenter Morgan Stoddard, is a Research Services Librarian at the Georgetown Law Library, and she is also an adjunct professor of law at the Georgetown University Law Center where she teaches an advanced legal research course.  She has a J.D. and M.S.L.S. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a B.A. in journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Data & Statistics for Researching Education (December 3rd, 2014)  

This webinar provides an overview of statistics and data available from the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics and other sources including: key statistical publications, online analysis options, and survey datasets.  Learn how to find local-level data, such as for a specific school, school district, or city, as well as national-level research on the condition of public school facilities, dropout rates, assessment, students with disabilities, income distribution of college graduates, and more.

Presenter Katharin Peter, is the Social Sciences Data Librarian for the International and Public Affairs Library at the University of Southern California.  She also serves as the Program Advisor to the USC Libraries Fellowship Program (2013-2015). Prior to USC, Katharin spent 7 years as a research analyst and consultant, conducting research and data analysis for the National Center for Education Statistics and other government agencies.  She has a BA in Sociology, an MLIS, and a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Science & Technology

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... The Bureau of Labor Statistics - Part 3 (Part 3 of 3) (November 19th, 2014)

In part 2 of this 3-part series on the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we focused largely on data collected from establishments. In part 3, we explore consumer data collected by the bureau that’s reported in its section called BLS Statistics on Spending and Time Use. The BLS collects data on where and how much consumers spend their money and their time.  For instance, how much money do Hispanic families spend on groceries? How much time do married mothers and married fathers spend on household and childcare activities? How has time use or spending patterns changed over time? These survey results provide a treasure-trove of data for marketers.
Learning Objectives:Learn how to navigate the site, locate and download data tables
    -Explore demographically segmented data tables that report income and spending by households
    -Find 5-year trend data for income and spending
    -Locate data on time usage segmented by demographic groups
    Whether you support a business, an economic development agency or students, knowing how to find, download and interpret labor force data will benefit your patrons.

Presenter Mary G. Scanlon, has served as the Research and Instruction Librarian for Business and Economics at Wake Forest University since 2004.  She earned her MBA from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University and her MLIS from Kent State University.  Her publications include “Reconceiving Entrepreneurship for Libraries: Collaboration and the Anatomy of a Conference” and “The Entrepreneurial Librarian: Essays on the infusion of Private-Business Dynamism into Professional Service.”  She is currently serving as the Chair of Business Librarianship in North Carolina (BLINC), a section of the N. Carolina Library Association, and teaches LIB230: Business & Accounting Research Sources and Strategies in addition to ESE305: Special Topics in Entrepreneurship -  Research Methods.  She can be reached at scanlomg [at] wfu [dot] edu .

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... The Bureau of Labor Statistics - Part 2 (Part 2 of 3).  (October 22, 2014)

In part 2 of this 3-part series on the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we explore in some depth labor force data the bureau provides including employment and unemployment, hours worked, wages earned and the cost of benefits. In addition to the data, we’ll explore BLS publications that explain and interpret the numbers for us.
Learning Objectives:  
·             Review the definitions of employment and unemployment
·             Learn how to navigate the site, locate and download data tables
·             Discover how to find data geographically segmented at the national, state and metro     levels
·             Find data on hours worked and wages earned
·             Locate data on pay and cost of benefits
Whether you support a business, an economic development agency or students, knowing how to find, download and interpret labor force data will benefit your patrons.

Presenter Mary G. Scanlon, has served as the Research and Instruction Librarian for Business and Economics at Wake Forest University since 2004.  She earned her MBA from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University and her MLIS from Kent State University.  Her publications include “Reconceiving Entrepreneurship for Libraries: Collaboration and the Anatomy of a Conference” and “The Entrepreneurial Librarian: Essays on the infusion of Private-Business Dynamism into Professional Service.”  She is currently serving as the Chair of Business Librarianship in North Carolina (BLINC), a section of the N. Carolina Library Association, and teaches LIB230: Business & Accounting Research Sources and Strategies in addition to ESE305: Special Topics in Entrepreneurship -  Research Methods.  She can be reached at scanlomg [at] wfu [dot] edu.

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Part 3 will take place on November 19th, 2014.  Please stay tuned for more information.

Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... The Bureau of Labor Statistics - Part 1 (Part 1 of 3) (August 13, 2014)

The Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor is the principal Federal agency responsible for measuring labor market activity, working conditions and price changes in the economy. Its mission is to collect, analyze, and disseminate essential economic information to support public and private decision-making.

In this first part of a three-part mini-series, we explore the numerous resources available at the BLS. In Part 1, we examine its website, explore several data sets such as key economic indicators and browse the Bureau’s publications.  In Part 2, we’ll do a deep dive into the economic data. We’ll explore its datasets for employment, unemployment, pay & benefits and regional resources.  We’ll also look at the geographic options for segmenting the data ranging from international to state, city and town.
In Part 3, we’ll look at BLS consumer data including Spending and Time use and the Consumer Expenditure Tables. Finally, we’ll look at an application of the CEX data for determining a rough estimate of market size that entrepreneurs may find useful.

Presenter Mary G. Scanlon, has served as the Research and Instruction Librarian for Business and Economics at Wake Forest University since 2004.  She earned her MBA from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University and her MLIS from Kent State University.  Her publications include “Reconceiving Entrepreneurship for Libraries: Collaboration and the Anatomy of a Conference” and “The Entrepreneurial Librarian: Essays on the infusion of Private-Business Dynamism into Professional Service.”  She is currently serving as the Chair of Business Librarianship in North Carolina (BLINC), a section of the N. Carolina Library Association, and teaches LIB230: Business & Accounting Research Sources and Strategies in addition to ESE305: Special Topics in Entrepreneurship -  Research Methods.  She can be reached at scanlomg [at] wfu [dot] edu.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents “Emergency Preparedness:  How to Get Ready” (June 19, 2014)

If you are an accidental government information librarian or an accidental manager, have you thought about an emergency plan for your library or department?  Planning for emergencies is critical to protect collections and equipment but most importantly, people’s lives.  This webinar will cover the basics of what emergencies to plan for, and how to begin formulating a plan.  Much information will be provided about resources for planning and a variety of planning tools from which to choose, as well as what to do after you make a plan.  This is NOT about preservation—the presenter will not cover what to do with wet books.  Instead this is about planning for emergencies broadly.  (This presentation was first given to the national network of EPA libraries in March 2014.)

Presenter Michele Hayslett, Numeric Data Services and Data Management Librarian at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has worked as a librarian for almost fourteen years but had no prior experience with emergency preparedness before becoming one of the co-chairs of her library’s Emergency Preparedness Committee in 2011.  In that capacity she has learned how far thoughtful reflection and good communication can go in creating a safer environment for staff and patrons.  In the last two years she has led two strategic discussions of emergency situations among library staff and administrators (“table-top” discussions), organized a “live” practical exercise in the library with emergency responders, and arranged multiple training opportunities for staff on various topics such as emergency prevention, recognizing stressed students and CPR training.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Lights-Camera-Action! – Congressional Committee Hearings,  (May 19, 2014)

If Congressional Committee Hearings are not already one of your favorite government information genres, it might be after this session!   Carmen pulls back the curtain to examine the staging of a hearing, reviews how the activity is documented, and then considers the various resources and tools we use to discover and access the transcripts and records of proceedings.  We will consider user groups that utilize hearings for research and ideas for promotion of this fascinating genre.

Presenter Carmen Orth-Alfie, is currently the Coordinator of Government Information Services and Engagement at the University of Kansas Libraries.  Her Federal Depository Library experiences span a variety of positions from student employee, support staff and now Regional Coordinator.  She has promoted the awareness and use of Congressional Committee Hearings through library instruction to students and researchers and at conference presentations for library colleagues locally and nationally.  Her enthusiasm for Congressional Committee hearings was formed while watching the early years of C-Span and reading the “Record Labeling” hearing.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Regulate this!  Federal Regulations (April 16th, 2014)

Need to know more about federal regulations and rulemaking like how the Federal Register and Code of Federal Regulations work together?  What do Unified Agenda, dockets, and guidance documents have to do with this? Lisa Nickum will briefly discuss the ins and outs of Federal regulations. She will then illustrate how different tools, both free and for fee, can help you discover current and past Federal Regulations as well as participate in the rulemaking process.
 
Lisa Nickum has been the Government Publications librarian at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden Colorado for the past 20 years.  During that time she has been involved with teaching in 2 courses over several years, Scientific Basis for Environmental Regulations and Environmental Law, where she has heightened her knowledge of Federal regulations.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Tracking Legislation (March 17th 2014)

Engossed Bills, Enrolled Bills, Concurrent Resolutions what does this jargon mean? And what does it have to do with tracking Federal Legislation? “Pix” Kathleen Fleming will guide you (briefly) through the process of how a bill becomes law. She will then cover some of the free and for fee sources that exist to help researchers track Federal Legislation.   

Presenter “Pix” Kathleen Fleming was a Science & Engineering Librarian at Wayne State University in Detroit, MI for 15 years. A Hoosier born, bred and educated, she returned to her Indiana roots with her position at the University of Notre Dame as the Political Science & Government Documents Librarian.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Keeping  up with Congress (February 21, 2014)

Despite its abysmal approval ratings, Congress is still a vital American institution that plays an important role in governing society. It creates laws that touch many aspects of our lives and vital interests. Whether you're interested in tracking an important piece of legislation, hearing experts and other witnesses testify on topics Congress is investigating, exploring the influence of lobbyists and special interests, or just indulging a morbid desire to see partisan gridlock in action, this webinar will showcase a variety of ways of keeping tabs on "the People's Branch."

Presenter, Jeremy Darrington is the Politics Librarian at Princeton University's Firestone Library. He has a BA in international studies from Brigham Young University and an MLIS from the University of Washington. He also has an MA and is ABD in political science from UC Berkeley. Currently, he plays second fiddle to Lynda Kellam as the vice-chair/chair-elect of ACRL's Law and Political Science Section. His interests include European politics, technology in libraries, government information, open data, and digital privacy.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Secrets of the Congressional Record (December 10th, 2013)

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the U.S. Congress. Many libraries keep these dusty bound volumes in their collections—but in the hands of researchers from a variety of disciplines, the CR is a treasure trove of battles and negotiations, revelations and curiosities. This session provides an in-depth exploration of the Congressional Record: the types of information it contains and the questions it might answer, its history and predecessors, and strategies for navigating the Congressional Record both online and in print.  

Presenter Melanie Maksin,  is the Librarian for Political Science, International Affairs, Public Policy, and Government Information at Yale University. She received her MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh and has been a government documents librarian, in one capacity or another, for seven years, including a perplexing stint in her first post-library-school position as both an English literature librarian and the library’s government documents specialist. Her research interests include constructivist pedagogy and the provision of academic reference services, and instruction and outreach strategies related to government information and other primary sources.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Geocoding for Beginners (November 18th, 2013)

Much information has a geographic element but may not be ready to plot on a map—for example, street addresses or ZIP codes. Geocoding is the process of transforming a street address from text into points on a map. This webinar explains the process of geocoding and introduces some tools for transforming  a table of street addresses to latitude and longitude pairs on a map, without using proprietary GIS software.
Presenter Christine Murray, is the Social Science Data Services Librarian, and serves as liaison to the urban studies and criminology departments, at the University of Pennsylvania Van Pelt Library. She received her MSI from the University of Michigan.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents...I Didn’t Know I Could Do That!: using government and government-related websites for research on just about anything (October 7th, 2013)

Government and government-related websites are great places to find a wide variety of information useful to librarians and citizens. All too often,  they are overlooked and underutilized. This webinar highlights a number of official local, county, state, and federal sites, and also covers some very useful demographic, legal, and medical information resources. The resources used in the presentation slides are all hyperlinked, so you can start exploring as soon as the presentation is available.
Presenter Alexandra (Alex) Simons, is the Research and Instruction Librarian for History, Political Science, and Government Documents at the University of Houston’s M.D. Anderson Library. She has done presentations and webinars for librarians, law librarians, researchers, and the general public on using government resources, and has also written articles and presented on marketing and branding for librarians and library collections. Alex is the immediate past chair of the Texas Library Association’s GODORT, and is currently on the Education and Development committees of ALA’s GODORT. She received her MLIS from the University of North Texas. She can be reached at acsimons [at] uh [dot] edu.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents...Historical Economic Data Sources & Economic Time Travel (August 21, 2013)

In economics, historical data aren’t necessarily 200 years old; historical data could be two weeks old. That’s because economic data are revised, frequently.  And those revisions mean that the historical data librarians find for patrons may not be the same values that an individual would have seen when the data were initially released.

Economic data are made from estimates. Over time, more information becomes available and these estimates are revised. Policy-makers, businesses, and consumers make economic and financial decisions based on unrevised data available at a point in time. These unrevised are useful for studying historic decisions and economic policies. This webinar describes sources available for uncovering historical economic data and methods for using those sources that provide a window into the past.

Presenter Pamela Campbell, is a Senior Librarian at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. She has been working with government documents for nearly four years, with a focus on economic history. Pamela is part of the team that provides FRASER <http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/>, a digital library dedicated to preserving the nation’s economic history.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Climbing Capitol Hill: The Basics of Congressional Research (August 8, 2013)

Do questions about congressional research make you wish you had paid more attention in civics class in high school? Have no fear, while researching (or helping others research) the activities of our Congress may seem daunting, it really isn't once you know the basics and a few tricks. This webinar breaks down the types of Congressional information that are out there, discusses what types of information they contain and provides strategies for helping researchers find and use them.

Presenter Rosalind Tedford,  is the Director for Research and Instruction at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University. She earned her BA in English and Psychology as well as her MA in English from Wake Forest and an MLIS from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In addition to managing the research and instruction programs at Wake Forest she teaches for-credit information literacy courses and is the liaison to both the Political Science and Communication departments. She has presented at LOEX, ACRL, ALA and regional conferences on issues ranging from copyright to technology trends to information literacy. In what little free time she has, she can be found hanging out with her two kids, watching ACC basketball and reading (but not at the same time).  She can be reached at tedforrl [at] wfu [dot] edu

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Just the Facts, Ma’am!  Getting Started with the U.S. Census & American FactFinder (June 12, 2013)

The U.S. Census and American Community Survey provide a wealth of social, economic, and housing information of use to social scientists, policy-makers, social workers, community activists, and anyone interested in understanding a specific population or community. For many, however, the complexity of the American FactFinder interface can be a hurdle to getting started.  This webinar provides a concise introduction to the U.S. Census and American Community Survey focusing on the background information necessary for understanding and using current population statistics and the steps to successfully navigate American FactFinder in order to obtain the statistics you need.  You don’t need to be a statistician to use these great statistics!  This webinar will be useful for librarians new to the Census as well as those looking for new ways to present American FactFinder to users.

Presenter, Katharin Peter,  is the Social Sciences Data Librarian for the International and Public Affairs Library at the University of Southern California. She has a BA in Sociology, an MLIS, and a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Science & Technology. She is also an adjunct lecturer for the San Jose State University School of Library & Information Science where she teaches courses on data librarianship and survey research methods.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... “Legal Research ...Without the Law Library”  (May 14, 2013)

Researching the law is a complex and difficult process, not just for library patrons but also for the librarians who are asked to provide them with guidance. Effective legal research requires an understanding of the interplay between legal materials from all three branches of government within both federal and state systems. Unfamiliar jargon and constant changes to the law can also pose unique challenges for the novice legal researcher. This webinar outlines a mix of free and widely-available subscription resources which can help library patrons find and use legal materials, along with tips to help librarians identify the important distinctions between “legal reference” and “legal advice.”

Presenter Jennifer L. Behrens, is the Head of Reference Services & a Lecturing Fellow at Duke Law School’s J. Michael Goodson Law Library, where she provides regular instruction on legal research topics. Jennifer holds both a JD and an MLS from the University at Buffalo, and previously worked as a graduate assistant in UB’s Charles B. Sears Law Library as well as its Lockwood Library’s former Business & Government Documents Reference Center. She served as Secretary/Treasurer of NCLA’s Government Resources Section from 2009-2011.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... "Come to Your Census: the development of the U.S. Census from its inception to the present”.  (April 22, 2013)

A census is a count of a country’s population as of a fixed date, to assess whether its population is growing, stable, or declining, and what the population looks like in terms of characteristics.  Censuses have been taken since ancient times, but few censuses can rival the United States Census in richness and value for us as government information professionals.  Mandated in 1787 as a mechanism for determining political representation for each state in the House of Representatives, the census has been taken decennially since 1790.  In this webinar we take a look at how this remarkable ongoing collation has developed and changed over the years, and how it provides researchers with vital information about changes in American society over time. 

Presenter Bryna Coonin, M.L.I.S, M.B.A., is a member of the Research & Instructional Services Department at Joyner Library, East Carolina University (ECU) in Greenville, N.C.  Bryna served as a graduate student at UNC Libraries in the mid-1980’s for the legendary regional documents librarian Ridley Kessler. She has worked as a reference librarian at the University of Georgia, and NC State University. In each of her reference assignments Bryna has remained intentionally and actively involved with state and federal government documents.  Bryna taught basic reference for the School of Information & Library Science at UNC-Chapel Hill and basic reference and government documents courses for the graduate library school program at ECU. A longtime member of NCLA, she has chaired both the Reference & Adult Services Section (RASS) and the Government Resources Section (GRS).

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents... All you ever wanted to know about Economic Indicators! (March 27, 2013)

Economic indicators are metrics that document the condition and direction of the economy and its sub-sets.  The data, which is gathered and reported by various Executive Branch agencies, is used by investors, legislators, policy-makers, labor leaders, economists, and many others.  In this webinar, you’ll learn:  what are economic indicators, examples of indicators covering a range of economic activities, such as: size and growth rate of the  economy, inflation rates, employment and unemployment, wages and hours worked, personal indebtedness, consumer confidence, and others, what the individual indicators reveal about the economy, and where to find them. 

Presenter Mary G. Scanlon is the Research and Instruction Librarian for Business and Economics at Wake Forest University.  She earned her MBA from the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University and her MLIS from Kent State University.  Her publications include “Reconceiving Entrepreneurship for Libraries: Collaboration and the Anatomy of a Conference” and “The Entrepreneurial Librarian: Essays on the infusion of Private-Business Dynamism into Professional Service.”  She is currently serving as the Chair of Business Librarianship in North Carolina, a section of NCLA, and teaches LIB230: Business & Accounting Research Sources and Strategies.  She can be reached at scanlomg [at] wfu [dot] edu.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents... Homeland Security Digital Library (February 27, 2013)

The Homeland Security Digital Library (HSDL) is the nation's premier research collection of open-source resources related to homeland security policy, strategy and organizational management. The HSDL is sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s National Preparedness Directorate, FEMA.  In this webinar, Greta Marlatt the Outreach and Collection Development Manager for the Naval Postgraduate School’s Dudley Knox Library and the Content Manager for the Homeland Security Digital Library (HSDL) will help users navigate the Homeland Security Digital Library.  She has over 30 years of experience working in libraries in various capacities. Ms. Marlatt has published several articles and is the author of a number of bibliographies and help guides for topics relating to Intelligence, Information Warfare, Special Operations, Homeland Security, Mine Warfare, Directed Energy Weapons, NBC Terrorism and more.  She has given numerous presentations on topics related to conducting research in the homeland security and military arenas. Ms. Marlatt holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Arizona State University, a Master of Library Science degree from the University of Arizona and a Master of Arts degree in National Security Studies from California State University, San Bernardino.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents...Information for International Development: Poverty Reduction, International Organizations, and Civil Society.  (January 16, 2013)

This session will covered International Government Organization (IGO) and civil society information sources in the areas of economic growth, development assistance, poverty interventions, microfinance, capacity building, inequality, remittances, and foreign aid.  The presenter examined documentation and statistics from International Development Organizations, such as the World Bank & Regional Development Banks, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, the World Institute for Development Economics Research, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, the United Nations Human Settlements Programme, the OECD, and the United Nations Regional Commissions.  Sources of international development data were explored at length, as well as development aid documentation from the World Bank and other international financial institutions. In contrast to, and as a potential challenge to the leading IGO paradigms, also explored were development strategies and information sources from civil society organizations (NGOs) with an emphasis on those in the Global South, including the Grameen Bank, Brac, ASA, and others.   Presented by Jim Church, the librarian for economics and international & foreign government information at the University of California Berkeley.  He is active in the ALA Government Documents Roundtable where he served as the international documents columnist for the journal DttP for four years, and currently serves as the Secretary of the IFLA Government Information and Official Publications Section. His primary areas of interest include international poverty and development issues, statistics, human rights, NGOs, and digital archiving.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... British and Commonwealth legal materials (December 13th, 2012)

Working with legal materials can be daunting for undergraduate students. Working with legal materials from a foreign jurisdiction adds an additional level of complexity and unfamiliarity. However, interdisciplinary approaches within advanced undergraduate classes may require students to find and evaluate sources of law from outside of U.S. jurisdictions.  This webinar considers two such examples drawn from upperclass level classes recently taught at Valdosta State University: a history class requiring the use of historical English capital statutes, and a communications class focusing upon comparative media law. The webinar discusses sources of law for the purposes of these classes, in addition to strategies for effective information literacy instruction that were attempted.

Presenter Howard S. Carrier, graduated with an M.S.L.S. degree from UNC Chapel Hill in May 2009. He is currently employed as a Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor in the Odum Library at Valdosta State University. Prior to becoming a librarian, Howard completed a law degree and a subsequent Master’s degree in Human Rights Law at the University of Leicester (United Kingdom), thereafter working as a Research Associate in the Centre for Risk and Insurance Studies at the University of Nottingham, and as a Lecturer in Law at the University of Sunderland.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents...United Nations Statistics and Data Resources (November 14th, 2012)

The United Nations gathers and produces a wealth of data on health, development, education, industry, and more--but given the complex structure of the United Nations and all of its publishing and research activities, it can be difficult to know where to begin the search for UN statistics and data. With UNdata from the United Nations Statistics Division, researchers can search many UN statistical databases through a single interface. In this session, we explored the benefits of starting a data search in UNdata, with a focus on gaining familiarity with the content that's available there as well as the ins and outs of the search interface. We also compared the contents and user experience of UNdata to several of the UN's other statistical resources. 

Presenter Melanie Maksin, is the Librarian for Political Science, International Affairs, Public Policy, and Government Information at Yale University.

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“Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian”: Web-based Outreach to Non-Traditional Documents Librarians (October 2012)

A presentation by David Durant, GRS excecutive board member and Federal Documents and Social Sciences Librarian at East Carolina University at the Depository Library Council Meeting and Federal Depository Library Conference, October 15-18, 2012.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Mooooooore Data at the USDA! (September 22, 2012)

This webinar gives information about the US Department of Agriculture's resources. The USDA website provides a wealth of data for users. Of course, much of it is about agriculture, but the USDA is also a great source for data you might not expect such as nationwide broadband adoption, food insecurity, and weather information. The USDA also provides access to data from other agencies, such as population data, in forms easier to use than the original source. However, the depth of content on the USDA site comes at the cost of ease of use. This session highlights the diversity of data available from USDA and provides tips for navigating the site in order to locate datasets and databases within. 

Presenter, Amy West, is Data Services Librarian at the University of Minnesota.  This webinar was jointly sponsored by the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology.

USDA Data Resources: http://z.umn.edu/usda4librarians
USDA Exercises: http://z.umn.edu/usdaexercises

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents... Researching the House Un-American Activities Committee (September 19, 2012)

The House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) was one of the most controversial government organizations in American history. Founded in 1938, it would spend nearly four decades seeking out real and alleged subversives before its disbandment in 1975. HUAC’s most famous witnesses would include former communists such as Whitaker Chambers, Hollywood film stars and screenwriters, and  even athletes such as Jackie Robinson. The committee’s publications offer an invaluable source of primary materials on such topics as American political culture during the Cold War, the history of American Communism, and civil liberties during a period of external threat. In this webinar find out how to trace the history of HUAC through its most famous documents, as well as historical background on the committee and its activities and other relevant federal documents resources from presenter David Durant the Federal Documents & Social Sciences Librarian at East Carolina University.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents … Hunting Down Fugitives and What to Do With Them Once You Found Them. (June 19, 2012)

If you have ever search federal government agencies’ web sites and come across a publication you have never seen before and wondered ‘why isn’t this part of the depository program?’ Here is your chance to do something about it.  This webinar will help you learn how to find publication titles that have not yet made it into the depository program, how to identify them as fugitives (aka Lost Docs), and how to report them to GPO for inclusion into the program.  This webinar is let by Vicki Tate a government documents librarian with over 20 years of experience and who is currently the Depository Librarian at the University of South Alabama Library. 

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents...The American Community Survey  (May 4, 2012)

The release of more 2010 decennial census data has more users inquiring about “decennial long form” data.  In 2010, there was no long form.  Instead the American Community Survey is collecting those kinds of variables.  But the ACS has a very different methodology than the decennial census and data are not comparable between the two.  This presentation lead by Michele Hayslett Data Services Librarian at the University Library of UNC at Chapel Hill,  focuses on the differences between the two surveys and provides tips for users.  Expected audience is anyone new to using the American Community Survey or anyone who wants to know more about how the ACS differs from decennial long form data.

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Help!  I'm an Accidental International Government Information Librarian: The Basics, and a Bit Beyond (April 17, 2012)

This session covers information sources from major international governmental organizations (IGOs) focusing on publications, documentation, and statistics. IGOs covered will include the United Nations, European Union, International Financial Institutions such as the World Bank, IMF, and World Trade Organization, as well as specialized agencies of the United Nations such as the Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Health Organization, the International Labour Organization, and UNESCO.  This webinar will provide viewers with an understanding of the uses of IGO information and how to identify international government information sources to meet the needs of users across a range of subjects, including international law, human rights, economic development, public health, demography, gender and women's studies, and more.  Presenter Jim Church is the librarian for economics and international & foreign government information at the University of California Berkeley. 

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Government Resources of the European Union (February 23, 2012)

The post-WWII political landscape of Europe, with its emphasis upon European integration, has resulted in a quasi-Federal system. Accordingly, researchers seeking European governmental resources, statistics, and legal information must consider materials produced under the auspices of Europe’s two predominant  IGOs (namely the European Union and the Council of Europe), in addition to the traditional, sovereign jurisdictions of Europe’s constituent states. This webinar, presented by Howard S. Carrier Reference Librarian at Valdosta State University, explores this topic using the example of one European state: the United Kingdom. Resources to be discussed include (but are not limited to):
EUROPA - http://europa.eu/
EUROSTAT - http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/
data.gov.uk - http://data.gov.uk/

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... the Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project (WVHP) (February 2, 2012)

In this session Beth Ann Koelsch, the curator of the Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project (WVHP) at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, discusses the history of the WVHP, describes the collection development policy for the Project, and how the collections’ materials are made accessible to researchers. She also examines some of the intersections between “govdocs” and the WVHP archives.  The Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project (WVHP), established at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 1998, documents the contributions of women in the military and related service organizations since World War I. The collection offers a wide range of source material, including photographs, letters, diaries, scrapbooks, oral histories, military patches and insignia, uniforms, and posters, as well as published works. 

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents... What You Need to Know About the Creative Commons (January 5th, 2012)

In this session we explored a non-government information source of importance to all librarians. The Creative Commons, formed in 2001, is devoted to expanding the creative output and intellectual property available for others to build upon and share.  This webinar looks at the basics of Creative Commons, the various CC licenses and what they mean and will show participants how to locate CC licensed content for use in their own projects and how to assign CC licenses to their own intellectual property.  Presenter Rosalind Tedford is the Director for Research and Instruction at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University. 

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... PubMed, PubMed Central, and Medlineplus - What's the difference? (December 9th, 2011)

Do you support health science students? Are you on the hunt for another non-Google tool for health questions from the general public? Maybe you’ve heard that PubMed, PubMed Central and MedlinePlus are great sources for reliable medical information, but you’re not sure which site is best for your needs.  This webinar led by Lea Leininger Health Sciences Librarian at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro provides an overview of PubMed, PubMed Central, and MedlinePlus with some searches and links to additional information. 

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ...
Finding your way: Maps and geospatial information from the federal government - (November 16th, 2011)

The federal government produces a wide array of maps and digital geospatial data from many different agencies that can be integrated into any reference interaction.  This webinar lead by Marcy Bidney, the Head of the Donald W. Hamer Maps Library at Penn State University, will help you learn about maps from the USGS, Army Corps of Engineers, the National Map and more!

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ...Beginner’s Guide to Legislative History (November 9th, 2011)

This session explains more fully what legislative history is (and is not), looks at the print and online resources available, shows what roadblocks may prevent patrons from finding complete answers, and provides suggestions for alternative sources of information (mostly from a North Carolina perspective).  Presenters Rebecca Hyman and Steve Case are both from the Government & Heritage Library , a part of the State Library of North Carolina.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents...State Agency Databases with Daniel Cornwall from the Alaska State Library (September 21, 2011)

In this session you will learn about the State Agency Databases Across the 50 States project, a librarian led effort to locate and share all of the publicly searchable databases produced by state governments around the country. Exemplar databases from Alaska, North Carolina and Missouri were demonstrated. The potential of what an easily accessible database listing could mean to librarians and patrons alike was explored. Presenter Daniel Cornwall,  is the Head of Technical and Imaging Services for the Alaska Division of Libraries, Archives and Museums. 

Project page: http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/State_Agency_Databases

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents... Good Health (Information) in North Carolina (September 7, 2011)

North Carolina state government agencies and public universities publish a great deal of interesting health and healthcare information of value to researchers and reference librarians. In this webinar, learn about important data sources and how to get access them. Presenters Rebecca Hyman Reference and Outreach Librarian and Kurt Brenneman former Agency Outreach Librarian are both from the Government & Heritage Library, a part of the State Library of North Carolina.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Resources for Guard and Reserve Soldiers and their Families (July 27, 2011)

In this session, learn about how you can help the Guard and Reserve Soldiers in your community obtain the assistance they and their families are entitled to as citizens. Topics covered include education benefits, debt relief, VA benefits and health care, military medical insurance (Tricare), and resources for spouses and children of deploying service members.  Presenter David Durant, is the Federal Documents & Social Sciences Librarian at the Joyner Library at East Carolina University.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents ... Beyond Google: Effective Patent Searching in Every Library (July 13, 2011)

This session discusses patent searching tools, both those freely available over the Internet and those accessible only through Patent & Trademark Depository Libraries.  Also discussed is how to do a patent search, what you should and shouldn't do when you're helping patrons with patent questions, and the pros and cons of using Google Patents.  Presenters David Zwicky, Engineering Services Librarian, and Hyun-Duck Chung, Librarian for Management and Entrepreneurship, are both from the North Carolina State University Libraries.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian presents... the Economic Census (June 14, 2011)

The Economic Census is a rich source of free, reliable data for business planning which includes: industry size and growth rate; change in number of industry participants; staffing levels and wage rates; and much more.  In this webinar, we’ll demonstrate how to use the Economic Census to find these and other data that business patrons will find useful.  Presenter Mary Scanlon, is the Research and Instruction Librarian for Business and Economics at Wake Forest University.

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian:  American FactFinder and Census 2010 (June 9, 2011)

This session will teach users how to use the new interface for the U.S. Census Bureau's American FactFinder, its online database for distributing all data from its surveys.  Presenter Michele Hayslett,  is the Data Services Librarian at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

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Help! I’m an Accidental Government Information Librarian:  Genealogy Using Government Information (May 11, 2011)

This session explores the different government resources available when researching family history. Resources covered are documents from the U.S. Census Bureau, and online products from other sources, such as databases, libraries, state and local government offices, maps and photographs.  Presenter Jane Johnson, is a Special Collections Librarian at the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County in North Carolina.

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Help!  I'm an Accidental Government Information Librarian:  The Basics (April 14, 2011) 

Our first session, "The Basics," provided a general, basic overview of government information as it pertains to reference work. What types of information flow from the three branches of government that are important to your patrons? What major portals are most useful for finding U.S. Government information? What types of government statistics are available and how can they be found? What basic knowledge do I need to effectively locate government information?  Presenter Bryna Coonin is a Reference Librarian at the Joyner Library at East Carolina University. 

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